Eram Garden, Shiraz

Eram Garden, one of the nine historical Persian gardens, a World Heritage, was built in the 13th century most likely by the Illkhanate or a paramount chief of Qashqai tribes in Shiraz and is located near the Khoshk Rod River, the main river of Shiraz.

Eram Garden, Main Building, Shiraza
Eram Garden, Main Building, Shiraz

The earliest layout, quadripartite Persian heavenly garden was probably laid in the 11th century by the Seljuks and was less decorative.

Eram Garden, A Persian Garden
Eram Garden, A Persian Garden

The Garden has been renovated over years, belonging to Qavami Family, it was designed by a local architect, including 32 rooms on two floors, decorated by tiles with poems on them.

Eram Botanical Garden, Shiraz
Eram Botanical Garden, Shiraz

Today, the complex is within Shiraz Botanical Garden of Shiraz University since 1983 and is open to the public as a world heritage landmark.

Sun and Lion Emblems, Eram Garden
Sun and Lion Emblems, Eram Garden

As a symbol of Paradize on the earth notable plants are ample in the garden including various plant types.

Eram Garden, Shiraz
Eram Garden, Shiraz
Sunny day in Eram Garden
Sunny day in Eram Garden

Jameh Mosque of Isfahan

Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Jameh Mosque of Isfahan

The Jameh Mosque of Isfahan, the oldest one in Isfahan, reconstructed and renovated from 8th century to the end of the 20th century, is a veritable masterpiece of Islamic architecture.

Colossal Columns, Jameh Mosque of Isfahan

Prior to Islam, this place was a worship house for Zoroastrian, and by the advent of the Islam in Iran, replaced with a mosque and became as a congregational mosque, used for the principal Islamic Friday prayer and sermon.

Courtyard, with two Iwans of four, Masjed Jameh Isfahan
Courtyard, with two Iwans of four, Masjed Jameh Isfahan

This mosque has four Iwans in each direction, placing four gates face to face. 

An Iwan is a vaulted open place. The Iwans are elaborately decorated with the Islamic niche-like cells called Muqarnas which are usually based on symmetrical and perspective patterns.

Ewan, Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Ewan, Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Seljuk Iwan, Masjed Jameh, Isfahan
Seljuk Iwan, Masjed Jameh, Isfahan
Seljuk Brickwork, Masjed Jameh Interior, Isfahan

The main constructions under the Seljuk dynasty include the addition of two brick domed chambers while the mosque was renowned in that era.

North Dome, Brickwork Simplicity, Jame Mosque of Isfahan
North Dome, Brickwork Simplicity, Jame Mosque of Isfahan
Symmetrical Brickwork, Northern Shabistab, Masjed Jameh Isfahan
Symmetrical Brickwork, Northern Shabistab, Masjed Jameh Isfahan
The God Rays (Splintered Rays), Interior Symmetrical Dome of Grand Mosque, Isfahan
The God Rays (Splintered Rays), Interior Symmetrical Dome of Grand Mosque, Isfahan

Two domes on theĀ north-south axis was a masterpiece in Persian architecture due to structural clarify and geometric balance.

Later the four-iwan form was complete and this type became prevalent in Iran and the rest of the Islamic architecture.

Pascal Coste Painting, Courtyard of Masjed Jameh of Isfahan
Pascal Coste Painting, Courtyard of Masjed Jameh of Isfahan

Owing to practical requirements of the space and political ambition, religious developments, further modifications took place incorporating elements from the Mongols, Muzzafarids, Timurids and Safavids.

Ilkhanid Altar, Carved Stucco, Masjed Jameh Isfahan, credit azizihonar.com
Ilkhanid Altar Carved Stucco, Masjed Jameh Isfahan, credit azizihonar.com
Ilkhanid Altar, Intricate Stucco, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan, Credit azizihonar.com
Ilkhanid Altar, Intricate Stucco, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan, Credit azizihonar.com

Notably and elaborately carved stucco Altar commissioned in 1310 by the Illkhanid ruler Oljuytu, located in a side prayer hall within the western arcade is a lively incredible feat.

OlJaito Altar (Mehrab), Masjed Jameh, Isfahan
OlJaito Altar (Mehrab), Masjed Jameh, Isfahan
Interior Furnished with Iranian Carpet, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan
Interior Furnished with Iranian Carpet, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan

Safavid intervention was highly decorative, with mugarnas, glazed tile-works, and also minarets flanking the south Iwan.

Safivid Tilework, Courtyard, Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Safivid Tilework, Courtyard, Jameh Mosque of Isfahan
Decorative Tilework, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan
Decorative Tilework, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan
Decorative Tilework, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan
Decorative Tilework, Masjed Jameh of Isfahan